handmade wardrobe additions

8 April 2015 Comments Off on handmade wardrobe additions

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It has been a long while since anything handmade was added to my own wardrobe.
However, in the last week I finished three pieces,
and am feeling inspired to do more!

The first was a sweater that used “recycled” yarn,
from a stockard cardigan knit last spring,
which never really fit properly,
and instead became a Messaline (pattern by Bristol Ivy) ~

Made from Quince & Co’s wool/silk yarn Tern.
Knit on 3.25mm needles. Six skeins of yarn almost exactly.
The pattern lengths are a little bit different than what her photos show,
and although she states that the pattern isn’t what the sample is,
I wish she had given measurements for the length differences.
As a tallish person (5’7″/170cm) I always add a little bit of length to patterns.
This one had an extra inch and half knit in,
and then blocked a little more than that.
The raglan length is a little short, so if I were to knit it again,
I might add another half-inch in there as well.
Overall, I like it, and am hoping that with wear I will love it.

Also two tanks for layering, and staying cool –
if warm weather ever arrives!
I really debated which of the great tank patterns to use
Grainline’s or Wiksten’s.
Both have such great reviews, with minor alterations in silhouette.
I eventually decided on the Wiksten tank,
because of my shoulder shape and I liked the shirt-tail hem.

For the ‘wearable muslin’ I used some vintage poly/cotton fabric.
Usually in RTW I fit between a medium and a small,
so I took a leap and cut a straight medium,
after adding 1/4″ to the bottom of the pattern.
When I tried it on the shoulders and front/bust fit perfectly.
but the sides needed a little slimming.
For the Liberty tana lawn tank,
I cut a medium to the underarm, then a small for the sides, still adding the length to the bottom.

Using Grainline’s bias neckline tutorial is an absolute must.
Although the process is a bit fiddly,
doing the understitching gave every seam the best finish,
and actually made the topstitching go more smoothly.

I LOVE the end result for both tanks. No wonder it has become a hit pattern, such a great basic.
Although I am fairly certain I will make a couple more in solid colors,
I am tempted to also try the new Cali Faye Collection tank pattern,
because of the lovely scoop back,
but perhaps will try her dress pattern instead!

 

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